Playing Blues, Boogie, & R&B

Thursday, January 12th, 2017
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

Would you like to become a ‘Boogie-man’ or a ‘Boogie-lady’?

Blues, boogie, Rhythm & Blues piano playing   

“Playing Blues, Boogie, & R&B”
Click here for more info: http://www.playpiano.com/musical-courses/blues-boogie-R&B-12bar-blues.htm

     What a great course! If you’ve ever wanted to play “the blues”, or any variation of the blues, such as boogie, R&B (rhythm and blues), Kansas City rhythms, Chicago Blues, and some forms of rock, then you absolutely MUST latch onto this course!

     The 12-bar blues is all-American. It developed right here, and until the last few years, it’s main musicians were right here in the US. I had the privilege not long ago of standing on the corner of Bourbon St. and listening to the musicians in Preservation Hall play some of the most authentic blues I’ve ever heard.

     You simply play 12 measures of the same chord progression over and over, each time improvising some different melody on top of those changes. And those changes are:

The 12 Bar Blues Chord Progression

4 bars of the I chord

2 bars of the IV chord

2 bars of the I chord

1 bar of the V chord

1 bar of the IV chord

2 bars of the I chord

      

  The 7th is usually added to each chord — so if the I chord is F, you would usually play F7 — that is kind of assumed in the blues.

     The structure of the 12 bar blues is very simple. And since it is fun, play it over and over again until you get the sounds you want!

      The “melody” of the 12-bar blues is something that each musician makes up as he/she goes along. It is based on the blues scale, which is a bit different than the regular diatonic scale we all grew up with — it includes all those “regular” notes, but also uses the flat 3rd, the flat 5th, and the flat 7th degrees of the scale.      
     

 The “blues scale” is really a combination of the major diatonic scale (the “regular” scale we all grew up with) plus three additional notes:

The flatted 3rd;

 The flatted 5th (or sharp 4th — same thing);

   The flatted 7th;

     So the blues scale really contains 11 notes — the 8 of the normal diatonic scale — and the 3 “blue notes”. 

     These are used in various combinations, as we shall see, to create a “bluesy sound”.

     The blues started  not as a piano style, but as a vocal style, and of course the human voice can sing “in the cracks” between the notes on the keyboard. So when we play blues on the keyboard, we try to imitate the human voice by playing BOTH the 3rd and the flat 3rd — BOTH the 5th and the flat 5th — BOTH the 7th and the flat 7th. We would play in the cracks if we could, but we can’t, so we do the best we can by combining the intervals to imitate the quarter steps that a human voice can sing. (Certain instruments can do that too — for example, the trombone. Since it has a slide, it can hit an infinite number of tones between any two keyboard notes.)

      In this course you’ll learn how the 12-Bar Blues is formed. Then you’ll play along with Duane as he plays a blues bass line for you. Rhythm & blues is next. Then you’ll learn about the old “barrel-house” styles, and work through a basis boogie-woogie pattern. Then you’ll learn some specific techniques used in blues playing, and by the end of the course you’ll be jamming on some blues riffs. Great piano course!

Click here for more info: http://www.playpiano.com/musical-courses/blues-boogie-R&B-12bar-blues.htm

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

All Music Is Made Out Of The Same “Stuff”…

Thursday, December 22nd, 2016
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 6.0/10 (3 votes cast)

Hello again this is Duane and this is  good stuff you really ought to know. One thing you ought to know is about the commonality of music, the things that are in common between styles or generous of all kinds of music. In the past unfortunately those musicians with the more formal training have kind of looked down their noses at those who didn’t have the benefit of a formal training and improvised. That was a serious mistake as they’re learning now; there have been some wonderful teachers that have pointed out the great masters such as Bach and so on were all great improvisers.   There’s nothing new about improvising, people have done it down through the centuries. All Music Is Made Out Of The Same “Stuff”

In fact most written music was first improvised and then because the composer liked what he heard himself improvised he got it written down one way or the other. Bach would often improvise his preludes and feuds in church and if it went well then he would go home and write it down, if it didn’t another day he would come. Particularly in the last century classical musicians kind of looked down their noses at Jazz musicians.

Unfortunately people like Leonard Bernstein and Andre Previn came along to kind of pop a bubble in that myth and show that all music has commonalities, it’s all made out of chords, it’s all made out of scale fragments, it’s all made out of patterns, it all has dynamics, it has chord progressions and so on and so on, so forth. Look at Fur Elise with me if you will [Duane playing piano] and so on like that. Now let’s just consider the little portion that’s right there. [Duane playing piano] We have a little pattern and then we have [Duane playing piano] the A minor chord, if you add up those notes, [Duane playing piano] it’s A, C, E that’s A minor, we’re in the key of a minor by-the-way. There are no sharps or flats in the key signature, so it’s either in the key of C or it’s in its relative minor, A minor. How do we know?  We look for the primary chords in the key of C. Do we see them? Do we see C, F, and G? No not in this song. What we see [Duane playing piano] A minor.

The next chord is what? [Duane playing piano] E, G sharp, B, and D. Is there a D? No there’s not. That’s the E chord isn’t it? Then  A minor [Duane playing piano] A minor, E, A minor, so we just have two chords. [Duane playing piano] A, A, A, that’s the one chord in the key of A minor, the five chord in the key of A minor, one chord, the five chord, the one chord. Now listen [Duane playing piano]. The first section of that great tune Summertime has just two chords, A minor, E, A minor, E, A minor, E, A minor, and then it goes onto the four chord which would be D minor and so on, but my point is there’s very little difference at all in the form between Fur Elise [Duane playing piano] and Summertime [Duane playing piano]. There’s a different feeling, a different rhythm and so on, but it’s the same chord progression, so look for those kinds of things, because they occur in all kinds of music. Just another one of the good stuff you really ought to know. Thanks for being with me, see you soon.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 6.0/10 (3 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

A Very Cool Chord Progression You Can Play…

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 5.5/10 (2 votes cast)

A Very Cool Chord Progression You Can Play…

Good morning, this is Duane, your Headless Piano Teacher with another little lesson about chords and chord progressions. I’d like to show you the four to four to one chord progression today, which is a very very useful chord progression, you can use it in a wide variety of songs and settings and so on, lots of things you can do with it. It’s really very simple, but until you understand it, it doesn’t seem simple, but all it is is the one chord, say you’re in the key of C, as you know, in the key of C, C is the one chord. What would the four chord be? That’d be the four chord, wouldn’t it? What would be the four of the four, in other words, what’s four notes up from F? It’s B flat.

So those are the three chords we’re dealing with. The four chord, which is B flat, the four chord which is F, and the one chord which is C. Let me say that again. The one which is C, the four chord which is F, and really the flat seventh chord which is B flat. B flat is four of F, but in the key of C it’s a flat seventh, isn’t it? So it’s the flat seventh to four to one chord progression really.

Now what you do is you play those chords inverted. In other words, that would be awkward to play it like that, so what you do is you play the four of the four in first inversion, that would be … Here’s B flat in root position, here’s first inversion. So you play the four of the four in first inversion, and then you play the four chord, which is F, in second inversion. And then you play the one chord in root position. As you know, there’s three possible chord positions of a triad, there’s root position, first inversion, and second inversion. We’re using all three inversions, but on three different chords. On B flat, we’re using the first inversion, on F we’re using the second inversion, and on C we’re using the root position.

Here we go, the four of the four, to the four, to the one. Try that with me. Four, four, one. Four, four, one. Now let’s slide off a note or two. Four, four, one. Four, four, one. Let’s use an ostinato on the left hand, a solid bass, say like C. Four, four, one. Four, four, one. Get that?

Now we can do it, say we’re playing the blues, we’ve just been on the C chord so far, so now we go up a fourth to the F chord. The one chord is F, if we’re considering F is our root. The four chord is B flat, and the four of the four is E flat. So we do the same thing on F as we did on C. We take the E flat chord in first inversion, the B flat chord in second inversion, and the F chord in root position. So we have this.

Now any time you’re playing the blues or want kind of a funky sound, it’s good to put a seventh in it. Hear that, I put a seventh in the one chord. Now I’m doing the same thing to … I should have stopped there, I did the same thing to the B flat chord as I did to C and F. So the root, the four, and the four of the four, which is A flat, back to the four, and then back to one. You can play through the blues just doing that, couldn’t you? I’ll do that real slowly here. Then you go around again.

That was a waltz, actually that I got into, a little waltz in the key of C using the blues format and using the four of four format. So there’s lots and lots of things you can do for it. Just one more thing you need to know about piano playing. If you like tips like this, come on over to PlayPiano.com and sign up for our free newsletter. That’s www.PlayPiano.com, and you’ll get a tip like this every three days or so. Thanks for being with me, we’ll see you again soon, bye-bye for now.

dreamstime_xs_21697101

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 5.5/10 (2 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

How to Master Rhythm Problems — Once and For All!

Sunday, November 20th, 2016
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
How to Master Rhythm Problems — Once and For All!
Two books, 6 Audio CD’s & 2 DVD Videos all in a big binder
How to Master Rhythm Problems -- Once and For All!
How to Master Rhythm Problems — Once and For All!
Item#: COMBO-35
$147.00

How To

 Master Rhythm Problems

As fast as ice cream   melts in the sun!

Date: 9:33 AM – Tuesday morning
From: Duane

I was absolutely amazed

 when I found out how easy rhythm really was…

Dear Piano-Playing Friend:

     Would you like to play the kind of piano that makes people being to tap their toes, or snap their fingers? Let me tell you a TRUE story about how I learned rhythm:

When I was in my late teens, I was playing for a church youth group “singspiration”. I loved chords, and I used to do pretty well playing most songs. But when it came to the “spirited” songs — the ones with lots of rhythm and life, I was lost. I overheard one of our youth leaders say “Let’s get someone on the piano with some rhythm!” Ouch! That really hurt. I knew it was true, but it’s not fun to hear if from someone else, especially someone you respect.

      Right then and there I made a decision: no matter how long it took, I was going to MASTER RHYTHM. I was going to learn every possible beat combination, and how to use those beats in each song, and what to do in the right hand to compliment what the left hand was doing. My search took me to private teachers, music schools, combos, books of all sorts, libraries, and listening to THOUSANDS of records, tapes, and live performances. I copied down various rhythm patterns on 3″ by 5″ cards, and at night I would analyze them playing them over and over again on the piano. It was HARD WORK for me. It didn’t come easy, like chords had for me. Chords were a snap, but not rhythm. It was difficult to read, and hard to play. I found myself rushing, dragging, stumbling, and generally fouling up. But as time went by, I got a little better. I continued to make notes of rhythm patterns, and started a collection of books and materials on rhythm.

     By the time I got my Master’s Degree from Southern Oregon University, I was starting to get the hang of it. I was beginning to understand what rhythm was, and what made it tick. I began to categorize rhythm patterns into different groups, such as rhythm & blues, jazz, rock, dance patterns, marches, waltzes, fox trots, swing, boleros, discos, ballads, gospel, bossa-novas, beguines, rumbas, cha chas, sambas, and so on.

     But it’s one thing to know a rhythm, and another thing to EXECUTE it on the piano.

     So I developed a system that is VISUAL — it allows you to SEE a rhythm while you HEAR it played.You count it out with me on the CD’s and on the DVD’s, and then you and I play it over and over and over again, until you get it IN YOUR BONES — down deep, where it becomes a vital part of you.

     Then it will become NATURAL, and people will sense the EASE with which you play all those seemingly complex rhythms.

     If you have problems with your rhythm — whether it is counting, or dragging, or rushing, or just not knowing what to do when….this great course is for you!

bullet2.gif (601 bytes)

Here’s some of the rhythm patterns you will learn:

Waltz, March, Swing, Ballad, Fiddle Jig, Rubato, Disco, Foxtrot, Stride, Triplet Patterns, The Shuffle, Gospel Waltz, Royal March, Polish Dance, Polka, Scotch Snap, Hungarian Skip, Rhythm & Blues, Western, Boogaloo, Hornpipe, Gigue, Jazz Waltz, Rock, The Skip, The Morris Dance, The Schottische,  Habanera, Paso Doble, The Sweet Pea, Samba,  C & W, Tango, Fatback , Rumba, Bolero, Bossa Nova, Cha Cha, Beguine, etc. — you get the idea!

bullet2.gif (601 bytes)

     Here’s what you’ll get in the course:

  •      Basic Rhythm Piano Book One — Here you will be introduced to my “baseline” under each rhythm pattern. This is the only place in the entire world that has this (because I invented it).
  •      Two Basic Rhythm Audio CD’s — You’ll get two audio CD’s that go right along with the Basic Rhythm Piano Book One. You and I will play EVERY rhythm pattern in the book until we get it PERFECT!
  •      TWO-HOUR Basic Rhythm Instructional DVD — This DVD video goes with Book One, so you can SEE not only the written rhythm pattern, but you can SEE my hands as I play each rhythm … EVERY RHYTHM!
  •      Advanced Rhythm Book Two — Once you’ve mastered the basics of rhythm, you can move on into all the rhythm patterns you’ve dreamed of playing — the beguine, the bossa-nova, R&B, gospel, bolero — and scads more!
  •      Four Advanced Rhythm Audio CD’s — These go with Book Two, and cover all the exotic rhythms such as samba, fat-back, boogie, country-western, cha-cha and all the others! You and I will play ALL these rhythms — it takes FOUR audio CD’s to get through all of the various rhythms!
  •      TWO-HOUR Advanced Rhythm DVD — another TWO-HOURS! — This DVD video allows you to SEE my hands as they play the beguine, mambo, boogaloo, sweet pea, and all the others!
  •      Big 3-Ring Binder & Disc Page to hold all the 6 CD’s and the 2 DVD’s and the 2 books!

Click here to order now!

Rhythm piano!

Yes! Rush me the entire “RHYTHM PIANO” course! (Click here)

$149. total for the entire course:

I get all this:

  •      Basic Rhythm Piano Book One — Here you will be introduced to my “baseline” under each rhythm pattern. This is the only place in the entire world that has this (because I invented it).
  •      Two Basic Rhythm Audio CD’s — You’ll get two audio CD’s that go right along with the Basic Rhythm Piano Book One. You and I will play EVERY rhythm pattern in the book until we get it PERFECT!
  •      TWO-HOUR Basic Rhythm Instructional DVD — This DVD video goes with Book One, so you can SEE not only the written rhythm pattern, but you can SEE my hands as I play each rhythm … EVERY RHYTHM!
  •      Advanced Rhythm Book Two — Once you’ve mastered the basics of rhythm, you can move on into all the rhythm patterns you’ve dreamed of playing — the beguine, the bossa-nova, R&B, gospel, bolero — and scads more!
  •      Four Advanced Rhythm Audio CD’s — These go with Book Two, and cover all the exotic rhythms such as samba, fat-back, boogie, country-western, cha-cha and all the others! You and I will play ALL these rhythms — it takes FOUR audio CD’s to get through all of the various rhythms!
  •      TWO-HOUR Advanced Rhythm DVD — another TWO-HOURS! — This DVD video allows you to SEE my hands as they play the beguine, mambo, boogaloo, sweet pea, and all the others!
  •      Big 3-Ring Binder & Disc Page to hold all the 6 CD’s and the 2 DVD’s and the 2 books!

Click here to order now — it’s 100% safe because it is 128 SSL encrypted!




Printable Order Form Here

Phone: 541-664-7052 for orders only — for questions click here:  Answers to your questions

About Us   |   Disclaimer

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

4 Ways To Play a Right Hand Melody On The Piano

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

4 Ways To Play a Right Hand Melody In a Song

 

Duane: Good morning. This is Duane. Today I’d like to talk about four different ways to play a right hand melody.

 

You have a lot of options when you play a right melody, and here’s at least four of them. I’m not saying there’s not more, but … in fact, I know there’s a lot more, but I’m just going to cover four basic ones.

 

The most basic, of course, is to just play a single finger melody. For example, if you’re playing “Moon River”, you can play … (music playing). Right?

 

Or, you could put one note under the melody. Usually, the best combination is a third, but not always. So in other words … (music playing). See that? Okay.

 

Another way is to play a whole chord. In fact, you could just play a triad (music playing). The triad, the three note chord, but you could also put in color tones.

 

Actually, I’m giving a third way already. In addition to the chord itself, you can put in a sixth or a ninth or a seventh or all (music playing). There’s a four note chord that I’m playing right there. Okay? So sometimes … often there are four note chords when you put in a color tone. A color tone, of course, being a seventh or sixth or a ninth or seventh and a ninth or a seventh and a sixth. It could be any combination of things like that. Okay.

 

Then the fourth way … actually, this is the fifth, we’ve covered four … is to play an octave filled in with chords. In other words, play a chord but play the melody in octave but filled in with chords (music playing).

 

Okay. Now when it comes to actually playing a song, we usually combine those. We don’t use one thing all the way through. For example, if I’m playing “All the Things You Are” … (music playing). I started out as a single finger, but then I went to full chord. So you want to mix it up to get some variety. Okay.

 

Well I think that’s all I have to say right now. We tried to cover four ways and we actually covered six ways. So you can see there’s many, many ways to play that right hand melody.

 

But there’s four of them: a single finger; two notes at a time; three notes a time, a triad; or four notes at a time; or octaves with a whole chord filled in, which would be four or five notes a time because you could put in a color tone in octave as well.

 

So that’s it for today. If you enjoy these little tips, come on to playpiano.com and sign up for a whole series of video tips and instruction on music theory and so on. So I hope to see you there. Bye-bye for now.

 ********************************************************************************************

BackdoorHi. This is Duane again and I’d like to tell you about a little book that I wrote a few years back. It’s called Piano Chords and Chord Progressions: The Secret Backdoor to Exciting Piano Playing. It’s a terrific resource about chords. If you want to know more about chords, you ought to latch on to this book. It’s just barely over ten bucks, eleven bucks I think it is.

 

It covers all the chords and chord progressions that I talk about in my videos. It’s just a great … It’s not a substitute for a videos or DVDs, but it’s a great summary. It’s so inexpensive that it’s well worth your while to get.

 

Here’s a table of contents. You just look down here and see all the things it covers. Starts out with major/minor, diminished, augmented, sixth, seventh, and on to thirteenth chords, and suspensions and alterations and then goes on to chord progressions, and so on.

 

It’s a very thorough book and it’s got a lot of illustrations. I’ll just toggle through a little bit. There’s the back cover. So it’s worth your while to get.

 

So I hope you take advantage of that. Thank you. Bye-bye for now.

 

Click on this link to watch this video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j6IkSWk3QeU&feature=youtu.be

PlayPianoLogo

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

Backdoor

Back_of_book

Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

**************************************

 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)