How Major and Minor Intervals Combine to Form All Types of Chords

Thursday, September 17th, 2015
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 5.3/10 (3 votes cast)

Major and Minor Intervals Are The Building Blocks Of Chords

This video demonstrates how major and minor intervals are stacked to form major chords and minor chords.

Click on this link to watch this video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TBRXYRhhcoQ&feature=youtu.be

Good morning, this is Duane. We’ve been doing a series on good stuff you really ought to know about music, and one thing you ought to know about music is that chords are built out of major and minor intervals. Major and minor thirds, to be specific. An interval, as you know, is the distance between any two notes. For example, if I play that note, and then that note, that’s called second. One, two. If I play that note, and that note, that’s a third.

That note and that note is a fourth, and you see why. One, two, three, four. That’s a what? Fifth, of course. Sixth, seventh, and eighth. Okay, that’s very simple, isn’t it? In addition to the number names of intervals, there’s also types of intervals. For example, there’s a major second, and a minor second. Okay? A major second is a whole step, and a minor second is only a half step.

Today we’re going to be dealing with thirds, so we’re dealing with two kinds of intervals, a third and a minor third. A major third and a minor third, so let’s see what they’re made out of. A major third is made out of two whole steps. In other words, if I go up a whole step from the bottom note, and then another whole step, that’s a major third. That’s the definition of a major third, two whole steps away from each other.

A minor third, on the other hand, is a step and a half. One whole step, and then a half step, so that’s a minor third, right there. Major third, minor third, okay? Now, that’s really easy to see when you’re on C. Maybe not as easy to see when you’re on some other note. Okay, what’s a major third above Db, or C#? A whole step would be where? There, because that would be a half step, right? That’s a whole step, and another whole step is there, isn’t it, because you’ve got to skip that half step. That’s a major third, so what would a minor third be?

That’s right, you’d lower the F to Fb. It looks like E, but you couldn’t call it E. If you were writing notation on sheet music, you would have to call that an Fb. You could call it an E, but musicians wouldn’t really understand that. You’ve got to be consistent and call it was it is, and it’s really an Fb, isn’t it, because the F is being lowered a half step.

Flats and sharps can be white keys as well as black keys, all right? We’ve established what a major third is, and what a minor third is. Now, all kinds of triads are built out of three note chords. No matter what kind of triad, they’re built out of either a major third, or a minor third, a stack of them. For example, a major triad, a major chord in any key, is always made out of a major third with a minor third on top. What would a major third be?

It would be that, wouldn’t it? So, if we had a major third and a major third, that would not be a major triad. That’s called an augmented triad, by the way. Okay, so remember this. A major triad is made out of a major third with a minor third on top. A minor triad is just the opposite. It’s a minor third on the bottom with a major third on top. A major triad, a major chord, is a major third on the bottom with a minor third on top. A minor chord, is a minor third on the bottom with a major third on top.

An augmented chord is a major third on the bottom and a major third on top. Two major thirds in other words. A diminished triad would be a minor third on the bottom, and a minor third on top. Two minor thirds, in other words. Augmented is two major thirds, diminished is two minor thirds. Whereas a major chord is balanced, it has a major third and a minor third. A minor chord is balanced, too. It has a minor third and a major third.

Now, tomorrow I think we’ll go into four note chords, and see how minor and major thirds are combined to build a four note chord, four note chords of various types. I’ll say goodbye for now, and then we’ll look forward to that tomorrow. If you enjoy this kind of series on piano chords and good stuff you ought to know about music, come on over to playpiano.com and sign up for our entire series. I think you’ll enjoy it. Till then, I’ll say goodbye for now.

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn
_________________________________________________________________________________________

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 5.3/10 (3 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

What Is a Tremolo In Piano Playing?

Wednesday, September 16th, 2015
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

A Tremolo In Piano Playing Can Add Excitement To Your Songs!

Click on this link to watch this video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RMiCRRovx88&feature=youtu.be

Today in our video we are going to cover the difference between a trill and a tremolo.

Good morning. This is Duane and we’ve been doing a series called “Good Stuff You Really Ought to Know About the Piano and About Music Theory.”

One thing you ought to know is what a tremolo is.  A tremolo is a little different than a trill. A trill is where you take two notes and alternate them like that. A tremolo is where you take a group of notes, like four notes, and you alternate them like that.

Out of that tremolo, you can start to form some runs. For example, if I’m playing that tremolo … This is a G ninth tremolo, by the way … I have G in the left hand, maybe a G octave, or a G root fifth. In the right hand I play the seventh of the chord, the ninth of the chord, the third of the chord, and the fifth of the chord. G ninth, in other words. I make that tremolo.

Notice I’m … It’s not individual finger action so much. It is some of that, but it’s also kind of a rolling of the hands. My hand is revolving, and that makes those notes go like that. You can push your damper pedal down to make it more effective, too. See, because that sustains the sound. Once you get that going, then you can take that … Break it up from the bottom up and tuck your thumb under like that. You can come down if you want to.

If you’re playing F major seven … You can go to all kinds of chords but it all starts with the tremolo, and then breaking out of that tremolo. You can start out slow, of course, if you’re new to that. Play up to four notes. Kind of revolve your hand and bring your thumb under the next four. You don’t want your hand to jump. You want your hand to jump as little as possible, in other words. It has to move. It has to jump, but do it as little as possible. That’s what a tremolo is.

So, if you enjoy these little, short videos, come on over to PlayPiano.com and sign up for our series of video tips. I hope to see you there. Until then, I’ll say goodbye.

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”
Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

————————————————————————————–

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Polytonality and Polychords: What’s The Difference?

Wednesday, September 9th, 2015
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

The Relationship Between Polytonality and Polychords

In our video today I am going to demonstrate how Polytonality and Polychords relate to one another.

Click on this link to watch this video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7gKuS3LXTtE&feature=youtu.be

Good morning. This is Duane. We’ve been doing a series called Good Stuff You Really Ought To Know About Music! One thing you ought to know about music is the difference between polytonality and a polychord. They’re related, but they’re different.

Polytonality refers to two tonal centers being used at the same time. A lot of contemporary, serious composers, classical composers, use two tonal centers called polytonality.

A polychord is different. A polychord is two cords put together. If I’m playing … I’ll give you an example. I’m playing G 7th here, and over that I go, that’s the E flat chord over G 7th. You get a different sound entirely. I’m playing G 7th and I use a D flat chord. That’s a polychord. It’s a D 7th in the left hand and B flat in the right hand. And here is A flat in the right hand. Those are really useful, those kind of chords, because they make your playing more interesting. A polychord is two chords played at the same time.

Polytonal means there’s two tonal centers, like I’m playing in two keys at once. Let me give you a crude example. Let’s say, playing Silent Night. If I play Silent Night in the key of D in the right hand and kept the key of C in the left hand, or I played an E flat, or let’s say I played it in G. Say I’m playing the key of G in the right hand and the key of C in the left hand. When you have two tonal centers that’s called polytonality. When you have two chords played at the same time, that’s a polychord. Like I say, related but different.

That’s it for today. If you enjoyed this kind of thing about music theory, come on over to PlayPiano.com. Sign up for our entire series. You can learn a lot over the course of time. I hope to see you there. Bye bye for now.

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­_________________________________________________________________________________________

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Musical Form in “Ain’t She Sweet”

Thursday, August 6th, 2015
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

What is Musical Form?

Songs are organized in various ways, and those ways are called musical form.

Good morning. This is Duane and we’re doing a series of videos called “How to Color on the Piano Without Crayons,” creative ways to make your piano-playing sound more interesting. We’re going to begin a series today on the tune “Ain’t She Sweet” and we’re going to take it from several aspects, and we’re going to color it as much as we can in one particular style, roughly known as ragtime or swing bass style.

Today the first day of “Ain’t She Sweet,” I’d like to talk about musical form because every piece of music has a musical form of some sort. Just like your house has a form, whoever laid out the plans for your house, they planned a bedroom here and a bedroom here and a living room here and a bathroom here and a kitchen here, and so on. They didn’t just keep building and adding things on, at least they shouldn’t have, but they had a plan. Music is composed usually with a plan like that. In the tune “Ain’t She Sweet,” let me play the first, the main section. Then it repeats again. Let’s see how many measures that was. I’ll count out, 1, 2, 3, 4, 2, 2, 3, 4, 3, 2, 3, 4, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and then it goes to a different section.

The theme is 8 bars long or 8 measures long and that’s what we call a Section A.  A is the theme and that was the theme of “Ain’t She Sweet,” what we just played. That’s repeated. After you play it once, you play it another time. We have A,  A,  and then there’s a contrasting section in the middle called Section B, and it goes like this. Then it goes back to A. That was 8 bars long too, so we have 4 sections, 4 rooms to our house. A which is 8 bars long, A which is 8 bars long, B which is 8 bars long, and A which is 8 bars long. We have 8, 8, 8, and 8. We have a 32-bar song.

Why do we want to know that? Well, for one thing, if you learn Section A, how much of the song have you learned? Have you learned 1/4 of the song? No. You’ve learned 3/4 of the song, haven’t you? All you need to do is learn that middle part. That’s a key to learning music faster. Almost always there are themes and variations in pieces, no matter what the form is. If you can figure out the form and what repeats where, you save yourself a lot of time learning it.

That’s the form of “Ain’t She Sweet.” Tomorrow we’ll take up swing bass. There’s a lot of elements that go into that type of playing but we’re going to take up this. Okay, and so on, and the middle section will be a little different. That sort of thing, okay. That’ll contrast with the first part, so we not only have rooms of contrast, A, A, B, A, but we have styles of contrast as well.

Next time, we’ll take up the swing bass, which is where … it’s called swing bass because you swing between a low note and a chord. We’ll take that up tomorrow. Please join me again tomorrow as we continue our series on “Ain’t She Sweet.” If you haven’t already signed up for our whole series of free piano tips, go over to playpiano.com and do that. Thanks. Bye-bye for now.

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

Here is the video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-bHAH15hlZ8&feature=youtu.be

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­_________________________________________________________________________________________

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Non-Harmonic Tones: Grace Notes And Passing Tones

Wednesday, August 5th, 2015
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

Non-Harmonic Tones Add Color And Interest To a Song

Grace notes and passing tones are non-harmonic tones – not part of the chords.

Here is the video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUS0oZG6V44&feature=youtu.be

Good morning. This is Duane, and we’ve been doing a series called, “Good Stuff You Really Ought to Know About Music” that has to do with music theory. One thing you really need to know about music is that there are passing tones, and there are grace notes. They’re called non-harmonic tones because they’re not a member of the chord that’s in force at the moment. So we have two subjects today, passing tones and grace notes. A passing tone is a tone that passes through an non-harmonic tone from one harmonic tone to the other. For example, if I go like this, that D is a passing tone. I could also do this. You’ve heard that sort of thing. Also you could do this. You can pass through more than one note. You can play a whole series like that. They’re usually undernotes, they’re usually under the melody, and you can do them both hands, of course. A passing tone is a note that passes between two chord notes. A grace note is simply a note that’s played very shortly before the main note. If I go like this. Hear that, that’s a grace note. I graced off that note. That’s the main note, but I’m sliding off that to get to there. I might do a half step.

Now when you use grace notes you got to be careful to not use too many. I used too many in there, but I’m just illustrating what a grace note is. You glance either a whole step above the note or below the note or a half step. It can be either one, so those are grace notes, whereas, passing tones are what? They’re tones that pass through the melody, usually as an undertone, not as part of the melody. Just two non-harmonic tones you ought to know about, grace notes and passing tones. That’s it for today. If you enjoy this kind of thing, come on over to playpiano.com and sign up for a whole series of free piano tips. I hope to see you there. Bye-bye for now.

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

Here is the video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUS0oZG6V44&feature=youtu.be

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­_________________________________________________________________________________________

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)