Posts Tagged ‘Chords & chord progressions’


How To Plug Fresh New Exciting Chords Into Your Piano Songs!

Friday, September 2nd, 2016
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New Exciting Chords

This video shows 4 ways to substitute fresh new exciting chords into your piano songs. Why would you want to do that? It freshens up any song to add a new chord here and there, particularly in unexpected places.

Like anything else, you don’t want to overdo it – there is too much of a good thing sometimes. But by inserting a new and surprising chord occasionally in your songs, you put your own distinctive brand on that song – so it doesn’t sound the same as everyone else.

Click on this link to watch this video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7-NUT77394&feature=youtu.be

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

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Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

Backdoor

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Complex Chords For Piano

Tuesday, May 24th, 2016
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Complex Piano Chords

Good morning. This is Duane and today we’re going to take a look at complex piano chords. We’ve covered all the basic kinds of chords. We’ve covered major, minor, diminished, augmented, sixth, seventh, major sevenths, minor sevenths and ninths and elevenths and thirteenth chords on various videos that we’ve done over the last few months. Today I’d like to cover the complex chords. You often run into them in jazz particularly where notes are altered and it’s hard to figure out sometimes what the chord is. Let’s take a look at that.

 

A complex chord first of all is something that’s been altered. It’s not a standard ninth. That would be a standard ninth. That would be a standard major ninth. Let’s say that we have a standard ninth but I flat the fifth. That’s a complex chord. Say I instead of playing the ninth, I play the flat ninth. Instead of playing the normal eleventh, I play a raised eleventh. That’s a complex chord. Anytime you alter a chord you run into that. Let’s take a look at some of the most common complex chords.

 

First of all you can use a flat fifth with lots and lots of chords particularly if you’re talking about sevenths or ninths or elevenths or thirteenths. You can flat the fifth of the chord. Let’s say that we have a C thirteenth. If we leave the eleventh out and flat the fifth, we have that chord. Sometimes that can be used as a passing tone like this. Hear that? It gives a little nuance, a little nuance to the chord. A flat fifth is a possibility and so is a flat ninth.

 

That’s a chord that’s very, very pregnant. It wants to move on to the next chord very badly till it resolves. Another alteration would be the same as a raised eleventh. It would be a flat five but we’ll call it a sharp eleventh. That’s basically all the alterations. Now you can combine color tones. In other words, we can not only have a C six but we can have a C six, major ninth. Play it like that, third, fifth, sixth and ninth. That’s a frequent sound that we get. Just move up by a half step and you’ve got the D flat chord.

 

Now I use several complex chords. Notice there. I use A flat seventh chord over a low G. That’s a flat ninth there. When we get home we can put, say if you can get a ninth or a second into the final tonic chord. I just wanted you to know that the complex chords are a combination of either altering one or more notes or combining one or more color tones or any combination thereof. For example, I could be playing a C seventh in my left hand and put a sixth in my right hand and a flat ninth like that.

 

Okay, that’s it for today. If you enjoy these kind of piano tips, come over to PlayPiano.com and sign up for the whole series of tips. They’re all free. Hope to see you there. Bye-bye for now.

Click on this link to watch this video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IaN5CZnSFLQ

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

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Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

 

Backdoor

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One Way To Learn To Play Piano – With Chords

Friday, April 22nd, 2016
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Learn To Play Piano – With Chords

The traditional way to learn to play piano is to take piano lessons from a teacher and learn to read the music as it appears in sheet music, and I certainly recommend that method if you have the opportunity. But many adults who would like to take up the piano are limited by time and availability of teachers, etc, etc.  They would like to play, but the idea of coming home after a hard days work and sitting down to practice the piano in the traditional method is not a pleasing thought. For those people there is another way to start playing the songs they like – without having to practice Up We Go, Down We Go for years – is to learn to play piano using chords.

Watch this video and then go over to www.PlayPiano.com and get started. You won’t get any younger than you are right now!

Click on this link to watch this video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BaJRQQ34Tpo&feature=youtu.be

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

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Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

Back_of_book

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An Overview Of Basic Piano Chords

Monday, March 7th, 2016
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Basic Piano Chords – How Many Are There?

Good morning, this is Duane.
Today we’re going to take an overview of chords just to see how many basic piano chords there are to get a good feel for it. We’re going to go into the specifics of major chords, minor chords, diminished, augmented, sixth, seventh, minor seventh, etc, etc, in the weeks to come. Right now I’d just like you to take a birds eye view of the whole chord landscape.

 

If you were coming to the Rogue River Valley and you’d just drove into town, you wouldn’t really know how to get to Jacksonville or where Central Point is or where Eagle Point is and so on. If you flew over the Rogue Valley before you landed and you had someone pointing out, “Okay, to the west, that’s a little mining town of Jacksonville. To the east we have Eagle Point, to the north we’ve got Grants Pass to the south we’ve got Ashland. You can see the Rogue River kind of winding its way through the valley. If you then drove into town or landed there, you’d have a much better idea of what the lay of the land was.

 

Today, I’m going to take you to a webpage that shows you the lay of the land. You see, there’s twelve keys on a keyboard that are different, right? You have A, B, C, D, E, F, G, plus the flats. Right? Seven white keys and five black keys gives you twelve possibilities. Therefore, there are twelve major piano chords, twelve minor piano chords, twelve augmented piano chords, twelve diminished piano chords. There’s forty eight basic chords. When I say basic I mean these are three note chords, they’re called triads, three note chords.

 

Of course you can get very complex and we will later on with four note and five note chords, but the basics that the three notes chords are major, minor, diminished, augmented. There’s forty eight of those and then each chord, each note can be turned upside down three times. For example, it is possible to have sex after Viagra, that’s called root position. If I put the name of the chord on top that’s first inversion and the name of the chord in the middle that’s second inversion, okay?  We’ll show that in detail in weeks to come.

 

There’s three inversions of each chord, aren’t there? Three times forty eight basic chords if you have one hundred and forty four basic piano chords. You may dispirit that, you may say, “Oh, man, I’m never going to learn those”. Yes you will. It’s not that difficult. Once you get the logic of it it’s very easy and we’re going to cover that in the weeks to come. Once you know a major chord all you do to find a minor chord is lower one note a half step, okay? That’s true of all of these, just a minor alteration and you’ve got the rest of the chord.

 

I just wanted to take you on this overview, and I’d like you to go to this page though so you’ll have it as a reference and I would bookmark it if I were you. It’s playpiano.com/101tips and then flying over chordland, but that’s hard to remember, so I’m going to take that URL, the address, and paste it in below this video so all you need to do is look down for that link and then click on that and you’ll come to this page and it’ll be clear to you what.

 

By the way, if you haven’t already signed up for my newsletter, be sure to come down to the bottom of the page – just toggle down to the bottom of the page and fill your name and e-mail and that will put you on our e-mail list so that you’ll get all our videos as they come out in instructions and so on.

 

Thanks for being with me and we’ll see you tomorrow as we continue with another short piano tip. Bye bye for now.

 

Click on this link to watch this video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EBLFDpFNoRg&feature=youtu.be

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

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Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

Backdoor

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Have You Discovered The “Backdoor” To Piano Playing?

Saturday, February 6th, 2016
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Playing piano using chords is a way to “come through the Backdoor of Piano Playing” leading to being able to add fullness and excitement to a song by improvising. See the backdoor at www.PlayPiano.com

Come through the “back door” of piano playing – learn to “color on the piano without crayons.” Sign up for our free series of chord-coloring tips atwww.PlayPiano.com

 

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Have You Discovered The “Backdoor” To Piano Playing?
What Is The “Backdoor” To Piano Playing?

Did you realize that there is a backdoor to piano playing? 95% of all piano players come in the “front door” – meaning piano lessons and finger drills and scales and endless practice until they can finally play a song that people can recognize. I came in the front door – I took lessons as a kid from the time I was about 7 until I was 14 – and couldn’t play a decent song all the way through if my life depended on it, plus I was “tied to the written music” – if I had no sheet music in front of me I was totally lost and had no idea what to do. But then I learned about the backdoor and I suddenly got a much bigger sound and enjoyed what I was playing!

Come on over to www.PlayPiano.com to see how you can come through the “backdoor” too!

 

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