Archive for June, 2016


Learn What Chord Progressions Will Do For Your Piano Playing!

Thursday, June 30th, 2016
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Chord Progressions…& The Riffs & Runs That Flow Out Of Them!

Chord Progressions


The amazing secret of learning a fewChord Progressions..that occur in thousands of songs, so by learning the progression ONCE, you willautomatically be able to play it — and the riffs and runs that flow out of them — in THOUSANDS of other songs!

     It’s almost like cheating! Other people and other piano players will wonder how in the world you are able to play a song you’ve never played before so well — with all the Piano Fills and Runs …you learned on another song!

     Here is a typical chord progression:

C       Am7       Dm7       G7

     It is commonly referred to as the “We want Cantor!” chord progression, because those are the first 4 chords of a famous song by that name.

     But you can use that very samepiano chord progression not only in “We want Cantor”, but also in “Blue Moon”, “Heart & Soul”, “Unchained Melody”, “Ebb Tide”, “Polka Dots & Moonbeams”, “It’s The Talk Of The Town”, and countless other tunes. You can also use the exact same progression in gospel songs such as “He’s Everything To Me”, “I Am Not Worthy”, and many others.

     So if you knew that progression — I mean REALLYknew it — you could playcountless songs, and portions of countless others.

     This same piano chord progression also makes an excellent introduction to most ANY song.

      And this very same chord progression also makes a great“turnaround” in dead spots in a song, as well as for use between 1st and 2nd verses of a song.

All this from just ONE chord progression!

     In this great course I will teach you a DOZEN piano chord progressions, and you will hear me play each chord and explain each progression in detail. You will hear me makeRUNS & FILLS & RIFFS of various kinds out of each progression — runs & riffs & fillers you can use, no matter whether you play gospel music, rhythm & blues, pop, rock, ragtime, jazz, praise & worship, or whatever. The principals are exactly the same no matter what style you play in.

Chord Progressions for piano playing!

 By learning a few runs & riffs which flow out of each chord progression, you will be actually practicing the “fancy stuff” you can then include in thousands and thousands of songs!

     You will get six CD’s where I demonstrate and explain each chord progression in detail, and show you how to apply it to your kind of music. I’ll show you how to make runs, fills, riffs, breaks — all based on each progression, and by changing the rhythm slightly you can use the SAME NOTES to play any kind of music from gospel to popular to jazz!

     Along with the 6 CD’s, you’ll also get a big book which has 96 pages and shows every note of every chord progression covered in the course. You’ll also get a big multi-color binder to hold your course at NO EXTRA CHARGE!

Chord Progression Course on 6 audio CD’s & Big Book & Binder Plus Book of Songs To Practice On…

Special Bonus!

$197. total which includes:

 “Headless DVD Video” Which Summarizes the Entire Course! (Watch Duane play & illustrate chord progressions & the riffs & runs that flow out of them!)

Order Now!

It is totally safe to order — 100% secure!

Or Phone 541-664-7052 to order

Or click here for more info: http://www.playpiano.com/chordprogressions.htm

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Do You Know The Circle of 5ths?

Monday, June 27th, 2016
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The Circle of 5ths – How Does It Work?

The circle of 5ths is a useful tool for musicians because it covers all 12 keys and shows the most used chords in any key, plus showing many logical chord progressions.

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For the very best thing you can do for yourself in piano playing, click here: http://www.PianoLessonsByVideo.com

 

 

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The Top 10 Piano Songs of All Time

Tuesday, June 21st, 2016
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The Top 10 Piano Songs of All Time
By Duane Shinn
Expert Author Duane Shinn

The top 10 piano songs of all time may be more a matter of personal preference than anything. Ask any piano student though, and he’ll likely name at least five of these 10. This list contains many of the “staples” of piano instructors worldwide:

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1. Beethoven’s “Fur Elise.” Take piano lessons a few years and you’ll certainly encounter this classical piece. Most every young piano student requests Beethoven’s “Fur Elise” early in his or her career.

2. Scott Joplin’s “The Entertainer.” Joplin managed to capture audiences during an era when “Negro music” was still controversial. Classical musicians of the early 20th century would have balked at Joplin’s name appearing alongside the likes of Beethoven and Mozart. Today, few would exclude this ragtime song from a top 10 piano songs list.

3. Pachelbel’s “Canon in D major.” Simply referred to as “Pachelbel’s Canon,” it often gets left off of favorite piano songs lists. That’s because it was originally written for stringed instruments. Nevertheless, the piano adaptation is one that most every intermediate to advanced piano student plays during his or her career.

4. Beethoven’s “Moonlight Sonata.” Beethoven had one of the most prolific musical careers in history. It’s little wonder that his name appears more than once on the popularity list. His “Sonata No. 14 in C sharp minor” is probably more widely recognized by its common name, the “Moonlight Sonata.”

5. Brahm’s “Hungarian Dance.” Brahm may be known better in mainstream culture for his “Lullaby.” Every piano student learns both his “Lullaby” and the “Hungarian Dance.” The “Hungarian Dance” typically refers to his “No. 5 in F sharp minor.” The “Hungarian Dance” is actually a series of 21 songs. A great many of them were simply adaptations of existing songs. “No. 5 in F sharp minor” was one of a few originals.

6. Debussy’s “Clair de Lune.” This song appears as one of four movements in Claude Debussy’s “Suite Bergamasque.” The suite was probably based on Paul Verlaine’s poem of the same name. Its soft, lilting sounds contrast beautifully with the rest of the suite’s joyful parts.

7. Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy.” Ludwig van Beethoven cracks the list again with this song from his last complete symphony: “Symphony No. 9.” It was unusual in regard to many of his works, as well as others of the time. It was based on Friedrich Schiller’s poem of the same name and included human voices as orchestral instruments.

8. “Minuet in G.” This familiar piece is somewhat controversial. It is historically attributed to Johann Sebastian Bach, having appeared in Bach’s “Notebook for Anna Magdalena.” The book was a series of compositions dedicated to Bach’s wife. The authorship of “Minuet in G” and another work was called into question hundreds of years later. Many musical historians now attribute it to Bach’s contemporary, Christian Petzold. Controversy aside, it remains a loved favorite of pianists everywhere.

9. Mozart’s “Turkish March.” No top 10 piano songs list would be complete without a nod to Mozart. His “Turkish March” or “Turkish Rondo” is a difficult piece to play, usually only attempted after several years of piano lessons.

10. Billy Joel’s “Root Beer Rag.” It’s fitting to include at least one contemporary artist in a top ten piano songs list. Billy Joel’s career is often reduced to his influence on pop music. But soulful ballads like “The Piano Man” only provide a glimpse into his musical talent. Billy Joel is considered one of the most proficient pianists alive today. His “Root Beer Rag” is attempted by many advanced piano students. Most agree, however, that few execute this lightning-fast number quite like the master himself.

A free email newsletter on exciting piano chords and chord progressions from Duane Shinn is available free at “Piano Songs”

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

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Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

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Diminished 7th Chords – Wonderful Transition Chords!

Monday, June 20th, 2016
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How Can I Use Diminished 7th Chords?

Diminished 7th chords are great for getting from one place to another – changing keys, transitioning from a chorus to a bridge – and just making a chord progression smoother! Plus – there are only 3 different diminished 7th chords, which makes it very easy to learn them all!

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Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

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Add Chord Fillers To Your Piano Songs Using “Echo Chords” (A Podcast – No Video)

Friday, June 17th, 2016
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Echo Chords – What They Are & How To Use Them

Hello, this is Duane with more good stuff you really ought to know. Today I’d like to look at the easiest kind of fill that there is – echo chords. When people start arranging, they think about runs, and fills, and counter-melodies, and so on, and so forth, but the easiest possible thing is to put in an echo chord. What does that mean? It simply means what it says. You just echo the chord. If your chord was this, then you echo it.

 

You and I know what an echo is. If you yell down the Grand Canyon, “Hello, down there!” The echo comes back softer than the shout itself, right? Unless it was magnified, but in normal context, they echos come back softer so that’s what you should do too. When you echo something, make it softer than the thing you’re echoing. Don’t go like this. Not unless you want a different kind of effect, but that’s not really an echo. An echo is what it says it is. You’re echoing what was just played.

 

There’s so many opportunities in music to echo, because there’s so many notes that get more than one beat. Any time you have a note that gets more than one beat, one, two, three, you see that? I had three beats there, so the chord was C major seventh, and I just echos it an octave higher, and an octave higher than that. I went straight up. You can do those echos in a variety of ways. You could roll them from the bottom up, or from the top down, inside out, there’s just lots of ways to do it. That’s the simplest way to get started in fills. Just chordal echos.

 

You should know also that there are lots of ways you can use echos. You’re not limited to that. In addition to chord echos, there’s also melody echos. In other words, in that song I was just playing, here’s a melodic echo. You see? I didn’t echo the chord, did I? I didn’t go … But I echoed the melody.

 

echos … This is not the subject of this little good stuff card, but echos don’t have to be exact, either. They can be approximations. In other words, in a melodic echo, I wouldn’t have to play the exact three notes in the melody itself. I could take two of those three, for example. You see that? I took part of it and echoed. I could take the shape of the melody, but not the exact notes. Listen. See that? I took the shape of the melody, which was down, down, down, and played it on different notes. It’s still an echo, but it’s an inexact melodic echo.

 

There are also rhythmic echos too. For example, if a melody, or if a tune goes … and you have time, in the next measure, you can come down, and go … You kind of find that question and answer kind of thing in a variety of songs, but particularly in gospel kind of things. It’s like the preacher’s preaching and the congregation is responding. That’s called a rhythmic echo. The echo is an echo of the rhythm, not so much of the melody, or the harmony. Although, you could do all of those. Those could be combined, too.

 

Well, that’s just more good stuff you really ought to know to be a good musician. We’ll see you next time around.

Click on this link to watch this video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtNoa2ck-EM&feature=youtu.be

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

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Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

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