Archive for May, 2016


Chopsticks On The Piano – Anyone Can Play It!

Tuesday, May 31st, 2016
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Chopsticks On The Piano

Probably the most popular and the most easy song to play on the piano is “Chopsticks.” Playing Chopsticks on the piano is easy because of the way it uses basically just two notes at a time, and moves logically from the inside of a scale to the octave note.

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Major 7th Chords For Piano

Thursday, May 26th, 2016
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Major 7th Chords – Root, 3rd, 5th, 7th

Good morning, this is Duane. Today we’re going to take a look at major seventh chords for the piano. Last time we took a look at minor 7th chords. Before that we took a look at dominant 7th chords, but today we’re going to take a look a major 7th chords. A major 7th chord is made out of a root, third and fifth and the major 7th. It’s very easy to form. You just pick out the root, 3rd, 5th and the major 7th of whatever key you’re in, whatever scale you’re basing your playing on. It’s a familiar sound, isn’t it? You’ve heard this, of course. That’s a major 7th chord right there. I arpeggiated it up the keyboard. Major 7th. Let’s go through all the major chords and add a major 7th to it. That’s a major triad based on the C major scale and the 7th degree of the scale is right there, isn’t it? If I add that major 7th to the root, 3rd and 5th, I have a major 7th chord.

 

In sheet music it’s usually notated as Maj7. If it just says C7, what they mean is that. They mean play the dominant 7th chord, but major 7th chord they say so. They say Maj or major sometimes, 7th, Maj7. What’s the F chord? It’s based on the F scale. It goes like that. If I take the root 3rd, 5th and major 7th that’s F major 7th. Of course, it’s the same in both ends. You understand that. Here’s the G major scale. If I take the root 3rd, 5th and the 7th degree of the scale that’s G major 7. If I played that that would be called a dominant 7th, but that’s the 7th scale note. That’s what I add. Here’s the D major scale. If I take the root 3rd, 5th and major 7th, that’s D major 7th. E is like that, E major. If I take the major 7th, it’s right there. Here’s the A triad, A major triad. If I add the 7th, the major 7th, it’s right there. Incidentally, notice the major 7th is always a half step away from the octave note. It’s easy to find in that regard. Here’s the D flat major triad. If I take the seventh note of the scale, there it is.

 

E flat major 7th. A flat major 7th. G flat major 7th. B flat major 7th and B major 7th. That’s really all there is to it, major 7th chords. So far we’ve had dominant 7th chords, minor 7th chords and major 7th chords. Then again tomorrow we’ll take up a new form of 7th chords. There are several that you need to be familiar with, but that’s it for major 7th chords. If you enjoyed this little series of video tips, come on over to www.playpiano.com and sign up for a series of video tips, so you don’t miss anything. Thanks for being with me. We hope to see you there. Bye-bye for now.

 

Click on this link to watch this video on YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WSPkjqngX1M&feature=youtu.be

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

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Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

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A Bluesy & Fun Sequence Of Chords You Can Plug Into Songs

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016
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A Fun Sequence Of Chords

Here is a fun sequence of chords you can use in lots of different songs. Watch the 6 minute video and you will catch on quickly.

 

Click on this link to watch this video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZureblPInns&feature=youtu.be

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

Backdoor

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Complex Chords For Piano

Tuesday, May 24th, 2016
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Complex Piano Chords

Good morning. This is Duane and today we’re going to take a look at complex piano chords. We’ve covered all the basic kinds of chords. We’ve covered major, minor, diminished, augmented, sixth, seventh, major sevenths, minor sevenths and ninths and elevenths and thirteenth chords on various videos that we’ve done over the last few months. Today I’d like to cover the complex chords. You often run into them in jazz particularly where notes are altered and it’s hard to figure out sometimes what the chord is. Let’s take a look at that.

 

A complex chord first of all is something that’s been altered. It’s not a standard ninth. That would be a standard ninth. That would be a standard major ninth. Let’s say that we have a standard ninth but I flat the fifth. That’s a complex chord. Say I instead of playing the ninth, I play the flat ninth. Instead of playing the normal eleventh, I play a raised eleventh. That’s a complex chord. Anytime you alter a chord you run into that. Let’s take a look at some of the most common complex chords.

 

First of all you can use a flat fifth with lots and lots of chords particularly if you’re talking about sevenths or ninths or elevenths or thirteenths. You can flat the fifth of the chord. Let’s say that we have a C thirteenth. If we leave the eleventh out and flat the fifth, we have that chord. Sometimes that can be used as a passing tone like this. Hear that? It gives a little nuance, a little nuance to the chord. A flat fifth is a possibility and so is a flat ninth.

 

That’s a chord that’s very, very pregnant. It wants to move on to the next chord very badly till it resolves. Another alteration would be the same as a raised eleventh. It would be a flat five but we’ll call it a sharp eleventh. That’s basically all the alterations. Now you can combine color tones. In other words, we can not only have a C six but we can have a C six, major ninth. Play it like that, third, fifth, sixth and ninth. That’s a frequent sound that we get. Just move up by a half step and you’ve got the D flat chord.

 

Now I use several complex chords. Notice there. I use A flat seventh chord over a low G. That’s a flat ninth there. When we get home we can put, say if you can get a ninth or a second into the final tonic chord. I just wanted you to know that the complex chords are a combination of either altering one or more notes or combining one or more color tones or any combination thereof. For example, I could be playing a C seventh in my left hand and put a sixth in my right hand and a flat ninth like that.

 

Okay, that’s it for today. If you enjoy these kind of piano tips, come over to PlayPiano.com and sign up for the whole series of tips. They’re all free. Hope to see you there. Bye-bye for now.

Click on this link to watch this video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IaN5CZnSFLQ

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

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Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

 

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The “Mellow Chord” – Minor 7th Chords

Monday, May 23rd, 2016
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Minor 7th Chords – Root, flat 3rd, 5th, flat 7th

Duane: Here is a printed transcript of the audio on the video for your convenience:

 

Good morning, this is Duane.  Today we are going to look at the most mellow of chords – the minor 7th chord. Yesterday we took up dominant 7th chords, and we said a dominant 7th chord includes the root, 3rd, 5th, and the lowered 7th, the flatted 7th of a major scale. In C, here’s the major scale for C, based on the formula whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, whole step, half step. If I started on B, it would be whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, whole step, half step, so the B scale would be like that, wouldn’t it? If I took the root 3rd and 5th of the B scale, it would be B, D sharp, and F sharp. Let’s come back to the key of C, it’s easier to see. If we had the 7th [degree 00:00:45] to the scale, we have that, but that’s not what we covered yesterday. The dominant 7th chord is called that. In other words, if you see C 7th as a notation in sheet music, it’ll mean to play that, the dominate 7th.

 

Today we’re going to do the same thing, we’re going to use those same 4 notes, except, we’re going to lower the 3rd a half step. Instead of E, we’ll hit E flat on the C chord. In other words, we’re just changing a major chord to a minor chord, but we’re keeping the 7th, same 7th, not the 7th degree to the scale, but the flatted 7th. You notice that’s a minor 7th chord. Those are very mellow chords, aren’t they? Very, very mellow, I think probably the most mellow of all chords. Yesterday we said the dominant chord was pregnant, it wanted to move somewhere, but this is very stable, you can just sit on that for quite a while, and it doesn’t really want to move, maybe a little bit, but not much. It’s a mellow, mellow, wonderful, harmonious chord.

 

Let’s go through the 12 major chords and make them all into minor 7ths now. That’s C major, C minor, C minor 7th. D flat major, D flat minor, D flat minor 7th. D major, D minor, D minor 7th. E flat major, E flat minor, E flat minor 7th. E major, E minor, E minor 7th. F major, F minor, F minor 7th. F sharp major or a G flat major, that’s a [inner 00:02:40] harmonic note so it could be either. We’ll call it G flat major, G flat minor, G flat minor 7th. G major, G minor, G minor 7th. A flat major, A flat minor, A flat minor 7th. Let me lower it a little bit. A major, A minor, A minor 7th. B flat major, B flat minor, B flat minor 7th. B major, B minor, B minor 7th. That’s it, we’re back to C minor 7th, aren’t we? Get familiar with those minor 7th chords, of course in both hands.

 

In addition to playing it as a block chord like that, or you can play it … you can get a whole big sound if you play it like that, but get used to playing on your left hand, also get used to arpeggiating it, in other words, break it up like so. If you’re more of a beginner, you can just break up the notes to the chord like that. You can go up and down the chord if you want.

 

That’s it for today, the minor 7th chord, so we’ll see you tomorrow with another little tip like this. If you’re not signed up for our series of tips, be sure and do that. Come on over to playpiano.com and sign up so you don’t miss any of this. Thanks for being with me, and we’ll see you again tomorrow. Bye-bye for now.

 

Click on this link to watch this video on YouTube:

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

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Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

Backdoor

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