Archive for April, 2016


Augmented Triads: Root, 3rd, Sharp 5th

Thursday, April 28th, 2016
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Augmented Triads – The Pepper Of A Musical Meal!

Good morning. This is Duane, and today we’re going to take a look at augmented triads. Augmented means to widen, of course, to augment, to add to, and so we’re going to take a Major triad, triad meaning a 3-note chord and we’re going to augment it. We’re going to lengthen it, in other words, so instead of root, 3rd and 5th, we’re going to raise the 5th a half-step. That’s an augment triad. That’s a C augmented triad.

 

Here’s F Major, so how would I make it augmented? That’s right, just raise the 5th a half-step. There’s G Major, where’s G augmented? That’s right. There’s D Major, D augmented. There’s E Major chord, E Major triad. How would I make it augmented? There’s no black key to the right of D, so I have to play that white key, but I can’t call it C but I have to call it B Sharp because I’m sharping or raising the 5th degree of the scale. That has to be called B Sharp.

 

There’s an A Major triad and if I raise the 5th there, I can’t call that F, I’ve got to call it E Sharp. There’s the D Flat Major triad, so to make that augmented, I just change the A Flat into A Natural, so that’s D Flat augment. E Flat Major, E Flat augmented, same principle. A Flat Major, A Flat augmented, exactly the same principle. G Flat Major which is all black as you can see, three black keys. To make it augmented, you raise the 5th to a D Natural.

 

There’s the B Major triad, B, D Sharp and F Sharp. How do you sharp a sharp? Well, that’s right. You just raise it a half-step but can you call it G. No, you have to call it F Double-Sharp. The symbol for a double-sharp is like a fat X, a fat X. You’ll recognize it when you see it. There’s the B Major chord, and that would be a B Major triad, 3-note chord. If I raise the 5th, that’s B Flat augmented.

 

There’s 12 Major chords, 12 minor chords, 12 diminished chords, and now 12 augmented chords, and that brings a total of 48, doesn’t it? 48 basic triads. These are basic triads, 3-note chords. Of course, you can have a lot more complex. For example, you’d have C augmented, C 7th augmented. There’s C 7th but it’s augmented. These are often used as traditional, I mean, as transitional chords. In other words, if you’re going from C up to F, you might use that chord.

 

Okay, that’s it for today, a little lesson on augmented triads. If you’re not already signed up for these series of video lessons, come on over to PlayPiano.com and sign up for those. We’ll see you tomorrow with another short little video like this. Until then, I’ll say goodbye.

 

Click on this link to watch this video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OW4QjBKyWzY

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

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Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

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Major Chords On The Piano

Wednesday, April 27th, 2016
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Major Chords Made Easy

Be sure to bookmark this web page on major chords: http://www.playpiano.com/101-tips/3-major-chords.htm That way you can always have it at your fingertips to go back to and review.

Click on this link to watch this video on YouTube:

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

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The “Pregnant Chord” – Dominant 7th Chords

Tuesday, April 26th, 2016
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Dominant 7th Chords – Root, 3rd, 5th, Lowered 7th

Good morning, this is Duane, and today we’re going to take a look at dominant 7th chords. Dominant 7th chords are sometimes called the pregnant chord, and we’ll talk about why they’re called that sometimes. They’re used a great deal in the blues, as well, but in normal music, I shouldn’t say normal music, but music that’s not the blues, they’re a pregnant chord and they are called that because they want to deliver, they want to move to the next chord.

 

You know, a major triad is a root, 3rd, and 5th of a major scale. That’s the C major scale, so we take the root, 3rd, and 5th and we have a major triad, or a major chord. The 6th is right there, the 6th note of the scale. The 7th of the scale is right there, but that’s not a dominant 7th, that’s called a major 7th. What we’re talking about today is that chord. In other words, it’s a lowered 7th, you can call it a flat 7th if you want, but most people call it a dominant 7th. If you took traditional theory and harmony, that would be called a dominant 7th.

 

That chord is not a stable chord. In other words, it wants to move. It wants to move. See, that’s stable, it doesn’t want to go anyplace. That’s stable, it doesn’t want to go anyplace. That’s a stable chord, even though it’s dissonant, it’s still stable. It doesn’t demand to be moved. This chord implies that it wants to go somewhere. If you are familiar with the circle of fours, the place it wants to go is up a fourth from the root chord, which is C. It want’s to go from C to F, so we have that normal progression, and you’ve heard that a million times. Most songs end that way, by the way.

 

That’s a dominant 7th chord. It’s formed by lowering the 7th degree of the scale a half step. Let’s go through all the major chords and make them dominant 7ths. Here’s the D flat major chord, based on the D flat scale, which goes like that. The 6th would be there, one whole step above the 5th, and the 7th would be there, so a dominant 7th is right there. In other words, you lower the 7th scale note. See, that’s the 7th note of the scale, right there, isn’t it? That’s not the 7th we’re talking about, we’re talking about the dominant 7th, which is a half step below. That’s a D flat dominant 7th, or it could be called a C sharp dominant 7th, because that’s an in-harmonic note. It’s both D flat and it’s C sharp, depending on how it’s used. By the way, this note here would not be called B, it would be called C flat, because you’re lowering the 7th scale degree. If you saw that notated in sheet music, it would be C flat.

 

Here’s the D major chord based on the D major scale. 6th is there and the 7th is there, so the dominant 7th would be right there. That’s a familiar chord, you’ve heard a million times, D 7th going into G in the circle of fourths.

 

E flat major chord is like that, because it’s based on the scale of E flat. Root, 3rd, and 5th of the scale. The 6th is always that whole step above the 5th, not a half step but a whole step. Then, the 7th would be there, right, but we’ve got to lower the 7th, so that’s an E flat dominant 7th.

 

Here’s the E major chord, based on the root, 3rd, and 5th of the E scale. There’s the 6th, there’s the 7th, so that would be the E dominant 7th chord.

 

Let me move to the left hand now. The next chord is F. There’s the F triad, F 6th, F dominant 7th. Not the major 7th, but lower the 7th so it’s a dominant 7th.

 

Here’s the G flat or the F sharp major chord. That’s the 6th, and that’s a dominant 7th. Notice the dominant 7th is always a half step above the 6th. That’s another way to find it quickly if you’re looking for a shortcut.

 

Okay, that’s the G chord, G triad, based on the scale of G. The 6th note is there, that’s G6, so that would be G7 or G dominant 7. By the way, in sheet music, the dominant 7th chord is just called 7. G7, or C7, or whatever it is. If the composer wanted a major 7th, he would say so. He would say Gmaj7, which would be there, but if it just says G7, then you would play that.

 

Here’s the A flat major chord, based on the scale of A flat. Root, 3rd, and 5th, there’s the 6th, and there’s the dominant 7th.

 

Here’s the A major chord, based on the A major scale. Root, 3rd, 5th, 6th, a whole step above the 5th, and a dominant 7th is right there. That’s A dominant 7th.

 

B flat, B flat, D, and F, the root, 3rd, and 5th of the B flat scale. There’s the 6th, and there’s the dominant 7th.

 

The B chord is based on the B scale, of course, and the 6th is there, and the dominant 7th is there.

 

I would advocate that you practice through all those chords, just like I did. Start out with a major triad, go to the 6th, then go to the dominant 7th so you can get a feel for getting to the 7th chord quickly.

 

Okay, that’s it for today. If you enjoy these little series of tips, piano tips, and tips about chords and so on, then come on over to playpiano.com and sign up for our series of tips. Hope to see you there. Until tomorrow, I’ll say goodbye.

 

Click on this link to watch this video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i9g9M-VT76Y&feature=youtu.be

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

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Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

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One Way To Learn To Play Piano – With Chords

Friday, April 22nd, 2016
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Learn To Play Piano – With Chords

The traditional way to learn to play piano is to take piano lessons from a teacher and learn to read the music as it appears in sheet music, and I certainly recommend that method if you have the opportunity. But many adults who would like to take up the piano are limited by time and availability of teachers, etc, etc.  They would like to play, but the idea of coming home after a hard days work and sitting down to practice the piano in the traditional method is not a pleasing thought. For those people there is another way to start playing the songs they like – without having to practice Up We Go, Down We Go for years – is to learn to play piano using chords.

Watch this video and then go over to www.PlayPiano.com and get started. You won’t get any younger than you are right now!

Click on this link to watch this video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BaJRQQ34Tpo&feature=youtu.be

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

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Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

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What Are Diminished Triads?

Thursday, April 14th, 2016
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Diminished Triads & How To Use Them

Good morning. This is Duane. Today I’d like to walk you through a page on the web about diminished triads. Diminished piano triads are really the salt of a musical meal. If you say down to eat a normal meal, your main items would not be salt, would they? They’d be meat and potatoes, or vegetables, or something. You wouldn’t sit down and have salt and pepper. Well, there’s a couple kind of chords called diminished and augmented chords that are like the salt and pepper of music. They add interest, but you don’t want to feast on them, because that would be too much of a good thing. This page has to do with diminished piano triads. I’d like you to bookmark this page when you get to it.

 

Right below this video I will put the link to this page about diminished triads. Then you can click on that link and go to that page, and then bookmark it. That way, you’ll always have reference to it. There’s an audio file that you can listen to right there by pushing that little button there. Of course, there’s text that explains all about diminished triads. Here’s a cheat sheet that explains the diminished piano triads, and shows them both on the staff and on the keyboard. A diminished triad consists of a root, a flat third, and a flat fifth. You can explore that there. Then there’s a video that explains it very clearly too. By just clicking on that, I’ll walk you through all the diminished triads, all twelve of them.

 

We’ve learned twelve piano major chords, twelve minor piano chords, and we’ve learned three inversions of each piano chords. That makes seventy two chords. Now we’ve added diminished triads to it. That’s starting to add up a lot with a lot of chords. By the way, if you haven’t already signed up for our newsletter, be sure to toggle to the bottom of the page and do that. Just click your name and address right there and you’ll be taken to a page where you can sign up for that. Okay, that’s it for today. Thanks for being with me, and be sure and go to this page and then bookmark it. Thanks. Bye.

 

Click on this link to watch this video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUUestsu9As

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

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Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

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