Archive for January, 2015


Jazz Chords: Are They a Different Animal?

Saturday, January 31st, 2015
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What Are Jazz Chords?

Here is a transcript of the video, just in case you want to follow along:

Good morning, this is Duane. Today, I’d like to talk about jazz chords. Over the years, many people have asked me how to create a jazz chord as though it’s an animal all to itself. It’s really not. A jazz chord is just a chord like every other kind of chord is a chord. In other words, you use the same chords in classical music as you do in jazz as you do in pop as you do in gospel, whatever. It’s the voicing and the touch that changes to get that typical sound.

In other words, in popular music you probably hear a chord like that, a G seventh, right? Well, in jazz it may be voiced more like this. That’s a stack of 4’s, not always of course. There’s a lot of different variations but let me just how you that.

Their just chords but the voicing makes them sound different. Here, for example, the seventh is on the bottom. It’s a G seventh chord like that but the seventh’s on the bottom, the third in the middle, and the sixth on top. They had a 6. It’s quite, they quite often add more color to them. More colors, such as that. That’s a little strange if you’re not used to it. What you have to do is, usually, establish a low root voice. In other words, if it’s a G chord you probably want to hit a low G. See, in jazz, a lot of pianists play with a bass player and the bass player does that. A pianist doesn’t have to do that. But, if you’re playing a solo then you would have to do that.

Let me do that slow, what I just did. Okay? It’s kind of a jazzy sound. All it is is a complex chord, it’s G seventh suspension. That is too, except it’s got a flat ninth in it. What that chord is, it’s an F seventh with a G chord over it. That was awful. Okay.

But, I just want to demonstrate that they’re the same animal. They’re just voiced different. Okay, here’s another. If I was playing the blues, I might go like this. Again, I’m voicing it with the seventh on the bottom. Seventh, ninth, third and sixth. Right hand happens to be at an octave but, of course, that could be … you’d use that in any style, probably. But, typically, it has a more open sound like an open fifth, or an open fourth like that. Okay? In jazz too, they use a lot of half steps so you get the same chord you just moving up or down a half step like that. Okay. That’s all there is to jazz chords. If you want to pursue that I’m sure there’s courses that could teach you that in detail.

Thanks for being with me and we’ll see you again tomorrow with another little tip like this. So, bye-bye for now.

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

You’ll learn piano chords galore and how to apply them when you play piano – major chords, minor chords, augmented chords, diminished chords, 6th chords, 7th chords, 9th chords, 11th chords, 13th chords, suspensions, alterations and more. Chords are the “missing link” in most piano lessons and you can learn them all easily. Learn piano playing and music theory at the same time – it will make your progress faster and you will understand music like you never have before.

Here is the video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6M6Oho3EK7w&feature=youtu.be

 

 

 

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Music Intervals On The Piano – 5 Different Types

Friday, January 30th, 2015
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Piano Music Intervals – Do You Know All Five Kinds?

Good morning. This is Duane. Today I’d like to talk about music intervals and the role they play in music, and the different types of interval. An interval, as you know, is the distance between any two notes. If I start on middle C and go up to the next note, that’s called a second. There’s different kinds of seconds. There’s a major second and a minor second. I want to spend a little time talking about the difference between those kinds of intervals.

This is called a major second because it’s in the major scale. Here’s the C major scale. A major second is one whole step above the root or above the note below it – one whole step, not a half step. If it’s a half step that’s a minor second. What would that be is the third note of the major scale so that would be a major third, wouldn’t it? If I lowered this to that that would be a minor third. Let’s take it that far: major second, minor second, major third, minor third.

Now the next interval you would think that would be a major fourth, but it’s not called that in music theory. It’s called a perfect fourth. The reason it’s called a perfect fourth is because those two notes have a perfect relationship. What do I mean by that? F is in the scale of C but C is also in the scale of F, isn’t it? That’s only true of two intervals: the fourth and the fifth. It’s not true of a second because while D is in the scale of C, C is not in the scale of D. Here’s the D major scale. See that’s the seventh [inaudible 00:01:49] major scale in D. They don’t have a perfect relationship. Therefore they’re called major. Major second, minor second; major third, minor third; perfect fourth. Why? Because they have a perfect relationship, those two notes.

Now if I go up another step that’s called an augmented fourth, augmented fourth. Augment means to widen it so I’m widening the interval by half a step, augmented fourth. This is a perfect fifth, and again it’s a perfect fifth because C and G have a perfect relationship. G is in the scale of C, isn’t it, and C is in the scale of G. Like the fourth, a fifth has a perfect relationship.

Now if I lower the G a half step that’s called not a minor fifth but a diminished fifth, diminished fifth. You can see that an augmented fifth and a diminished fifth are the same same sound, but it depends how they’re written on paper. If on a sheet of music it says C and F sharp, then that’s an augmented forth. If, on the other hand, it says C and G flat, then that’s a diminished fifth. Got that? This can be a little confusing at first but you’ll catch on.

Let’s back up a little bit. Major second, minor second; major third, minor third; perfect fourth, augmented fourth; perfect fifth, diminished fifth. Now let’s go ahead. That’s a perfect fifth, as you know. What would this be? Right, that’s an augmented fifth. You’re widening the perfect interval a half step, so that’s an augmented fifth. This is a sixth, one two three four five six, because it’s the sixth note of the C scale. If I lower that top note it’s a minor sixth, isn’t it? Wait a minute. We just said that that note was an augmented fifth. How can it be a minor sixth? Because they’re in harmonic, aren’t they? In other words, that depends who that’s written. They sound the same but if it’s written as a G sharp above C, that’s an augmented fifth. If it’s written as A flat, that’s a minor sixth.

Now if I go up another half step that’s called a minor seventh. Now this gets confusing because there’s a chord called a minor seventh, but it has nothing to do with the chord. That’s just the interval between C and B flat is a minor seventh. Excuse me just a minute. There’s C and B natural. That’s a major seventh. We have a minor seventh and a major seventh. Then if I go up another half step that’s a perfect eighth, isn’t it? We know it’s perfect because they’re in each other’s scale. Is C in the scale of C? Yeah. Is C in the scale of C? Yeah, so there’s three kinds of perfect intervals. There’s a fourth, a fifth, and an octave. There’s major intervals – major seconds, major third, major sixth, major seventh – and there’s minor intervals – minor third, minor sixth, minor seventh. There’s diminished intervals. There’s a diminished fifth. I could have a diminished fourth. It’s not used very much because a diminished fourth is the same thing as a major third, but if it was written that way, if that was written as C in F flat then that would be a diminished fourth.

Sorry about my voice. It just keeps catching. That’s it for today, just a little music theory about intervals. Of course we use intervals … You can’t play any kind of music without dealing with intervals like that. There’s a major seventh. There’s a minor seventh because that’s the seventh note of that scale, and so on. Got to be aware of those things because they help you out over time. Thanks for being with me. If you’re not already signed up for our free piano tips be sure and do that. Come on over to playpiano.com and sign up. Thanks. Bye bye for now.

 

 

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

You’ll learn piano chords galore and how to apply them when you play piano – major chords, minor chords, augmented chords, diminished chords, 6th chords, 7th chords, 9th chords, 11th chords, 13th chords, suspensions, alterations and more. Chords are the “missing link” in most piano lessons and you can learn them all easily. Learn piano playing and music theory at the same time – it will make your progress faster and you will understand music like you never have before.

Here is the video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f91MwVyfq9M

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How To Walk Up The Musical Scale To Change Chords

Thursday, January 29th, 2015
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Musical Scale Walking

When you are moving from one chord to another in a song, it helps to know the musical scale of the chord that you are on as you change chords,  because you can then just “walk up the scale” from one chord to another. Sometimes this is done in octaves and sometimes in 10ths – usually in the left hand. Watch this short video and you will understand.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4WnimIXY0cw

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

You’ll learn piano chords galore and how to apply them when you play piano – major chords, minor chords, augmented chords, diminished chords, 6th chords, 7th chords, 9th chords, 11th chords, 13th chords, suspensions, alterations and more. Chords are the “missing link” in most piano lessons and you can learn them all easily. Learn piano playing and music theory at the same time – it will make your progress faster.

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Can You Make Your Piano Chords Fatter? Yes!

Wednesday, January 28th, 2015
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Piano Chords Fatter For a Bigger, Fuller Sound

How can I make my piano chords fatter and more substantial? I want a fuller, bigger sound, but I don’t know how to do that. Over the years I have had many students ask me some variety of that question, and there is an answer. Please watch this short 7-minute video and you will see several ways to do that.

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

You’ll learn piano chords galore and how to apply them when you play piano – major chords, minor chords, augmented chords, diminished chords, 6th chords, 7th chords, 9th chords, 11th chords, 13th chords, suspensions, alterations and more. Chords are the “missing link” in most piano lessons and you can learn them all easily. Learn piano playing and music theory at the same time – it will make your progress faster and you will understand music like you never have before.

Here is the video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjtwueNGLYU

 

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How To Fill In Those Areas In Your Piano Songs Where Nothing Is Happening

Tuesday, January 27th, 2015
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Your Piano Songs – Fill In The Empty Spaces!

 

It’s usually at the end of a phrase or a section, and usually one or more notes are being sustained, or there are simply rests in those measures. Watch this short video and you will see me demonstrate a couple ways to fill up those dead spaces in a piano song.

***For lots more good stuff on piano playing come on over to my website at http://www.playpiano.com and sign up for our free piano tips – “Exciting Piano Chords & Sizzling Chord Progressions!”

Here’s a great little book on chords and chord progressions on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Chords-Chord-Progressions-Exciting-ebook/dp/B0076OUGDE/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404158669&sr=1-1&keywords=piano+chords+duane+shinn

You’ll learn piano chords galore and how to apply them when you play piano – major chords, minor chords, augmented chords, diminished chords, 6th chords, 7th chords, 9th chords, 11th chords, 13th chords, suspensions, alterations and more. Chords are the “missing link” in most piano lessons and you can learn them all easily. Learn piano playing and music theory at the same time – it will make your progress faster and you will understand music like you never have before.

Here is the video on YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3q3gLyIoxyM&feature=youtu.be

 

 

 

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