Archive for August, 2014


Free Piano Podcasts On “Good Stuff Every Pianist Needs To Know About Music!”

Friday, August 29th, 2014
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Free Piano Podcasts On Syncopation, Suspensions, Cadences, & Other Good Stuff For Piano Players!

Good morning. This is Duane Shinn. Today I’d like to show you my free piano podcast. They’re free and you can go over there and listen to all of them if you’d like to. It’s at a site called Spreaker, S-p-r-e-a-k-e-r, and if you just type in Spreaker followed by Duane Shinn you’ll come right to it. I’ll also put the URL in the information right below the video as well, okay? (Here it is: http://www.spreaker.com/user/duaneshinn)

Let’s take a look at that. There’s several; there’s more than this. Let me expand that a bit. Yeah. There’s one call “Syncopation in Music” that you can listen to: how to make any chord sound complex using parallel and contrary octaves, Plagal cadences. Let me just give you a sample of what these sound like. This won’t be very loud because my mic doesn’t pick up the computer speaker very well but you can get a sample of what it’s like.

Podcast: “Hi. This is Duane and I’d like to share with you today some good stuff you really ought to know about music theory. Today we’re going to take up the plagal cadence. Plagal is a big two dollar word that simply means a chord progression that goes from the four chord to the one chord in any key. If you’re in the key of B flat, the four chord would be E flat and the one chord would be B flat, and so on like that, okay?” This particular podcast is six minutes long. Most of these are five, six minutes. Some are a lot longer. A couple are twelve minutes, and so on.

There’s a key of C review, several of those. Then the modal scales: Dorian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, and so on. That’s fascinating, too. The N6 chord in music: very, very few people know what the N6 chord is. The commonality of music. Suspensions in music. The overtone series. The Picardy third: what is that? Most people don’t know what the Picardy third is. Three musical cadences every pianist should know. Then right hand rapid fire runs. Polytonality: what is it? What’s a tune made out of? Passing tones: what are they? That’s a long one, ten minutes I see. Parallel stack third chords and another one on the Picardy third.

Lots of good stuff there. Good stuff you really ought to know. Every pianist ought to know that. Go on over to http://www.spreaker.com/user/duaneshinn and listen to any of those podcasts, okay? Like I say, I’ll put the URL down below the video here so you can click right through to that. Thanks for being with me, and we’ll see you again soon. Bye bye for now.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UiQnvhG_ztw&feature=youtu.be ___________________________________________________________________________________

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Piano Keys – What Does It Mean To “Play In The Key Of….”?

Thursday, August 28th, 2014
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Piano Keys – Two Different Meanings

Good morning! This is Duane. Today I’d like to talk about the subject of piano keys.

Now there’s two meanings for piano keys. One meaning is these things on the keyboard. Those are called piano keys whether they’re black or white. For beginners, we’re going to go over that real quickly.

There’s another concept about piano keys you’re playing. When you play a song, you’re playing it in a particular key. You’re playing in the key of F, or you’re playing in the key of B flat, or you’re playing in the key of D or whatever. We’re going to talk about what it means to play in those keys. Let’s start off real simply and just talk about the piano keys, first of all, okay?

If I start at the far left end of my keyboard, and you can’t see that far down I don’t think, but that’s an A. The first white note is A, then B, C, D, E, F, G. Then it starts over again with A, B, C, D, E, F, G. A, B, C, D, E, F, G. A, B, C, D, E, F, G. A, B, C, D, E, F, G. A, B, C, D, E, F, G. A, B, C, D, E, F, G. A, B, C, and the top note is a C, okay?

There are seven octaves between the bottom note and the top key. An octave is an eight, like octopus, eight. An octave is where it encompasses from one letter to the same letter, like A to A, or B to B, or C to C. That’s an octave. There’s seven of those going from the bottom of the keyboard to the top. In total, there’s 88 keys counting all the black and white keys.

Now let’s talk about the black keys, okay? If this is C, that note is C sharp because I’m going up a half step above C, but it’s also called D flat. Every black key has two names. That’s called enharmonic notes. Enharmonic notes. They can function as a C sharp or a D flat. It depends on the situation in the song.

If that’s D, what’s that? D sharp. If that’s E, what’s that? E flat. Here’s F, so that’s F sharp or G flat. I can use it either way, can’t I? G sharp or A flat. A sharp or B flat. I think that’s as far as we’ll go in terms of piano keys.

There’s such a thing as double-flats and double-sharps, but I don’t think I’ll take that up here. Just to satisfy your curiosity, in music if you run into a B double-flat, it means to lower that B a whole step, not there but there. A B double-flat is the same as A. It’s enharmonic with A, but for reasons of key and music theory that I don’t want to explain, it would be notated on the sheet of music as a B double-flat. Okay, enough of that.

The second subject of piano keys is that you can play in a given key. Since there’s twelve different keys: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. There’s twelve different keys because if I go there, I’ve already played a C down here, haven’t I? There’s twelve different major keys I can play in. There’s also twelve different minor keys I can play in because every major key has a relative minor, a kissin’ cousin that uses the same scale.

When I play a song in the key of C … Let me play a song in the key of C. I’m basing my playing on that scale of C. If I play a song like this, I’m basing my playing on the key of D flat which goes like that. Okay? If I play a song in the key of D, I’m basing my playing on the key of D, which goes like that. We’ll talk about why it goes like that in a minute.

If I’m playing a song like this, I’m playing in the key of E flat, based on the scale of E flat, and so on. I can play in all twelve keys that way. Some are a little more difficult to play in, and some are easier to play in. You get used to playing in certain keys. Each key, incidentally, has its own sonority. It has its own feeling.

Some people argue that all keys are equal. If that’s the case, why do you think ‘Joy to the World’, for example, or the ‘Hallelujah Chorus’ is played in the key of D? Because it’s a bright, bright key, okay? Handel knew that, and so that’s why he wrote it in that key. There’s a lot of songs that are very mellow that are in the key of D flat because it’s a mellow key. So each key has its own flavor. It’s mathematically almost exactly the same, but it has its own sonority.

If I’m going to play in the key of C, I’ve got to base my playing on the scale of C, which is not to say I can’t use other notes, but it’s based on this scale which goes like that. Now why does it go like that? Because there is a rule in music theory that after you pick the first note, the key you’re playing, you have to go up a whole step, and then a whole step, then a half step, whole step, whole step, whole step, half step. Okay?

That’s easy to see in the key of C. That’s a whole step because I’m skipping that, right? That’s a whole step because I’m skipping E flat. That’s a half step because there’s nothing in the crack here besides dust. No, there’s no dust either. Okay, this is a whole step between F and G because it skips that F sharp or G flat. That’s a whole step because it skips that. That’s a whole step because it skips that, and that’s a half step.

The formula for a major scale is whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half. Okay? Now that’s easy to see in the key of C because it’s all white, but let’s take another.

Let’s start on B this time. Where’s a whole step above B? It’s not here. That’s a half step. I have to go not to C but to C sharp. So the second note of the B scale is C sharp. Now I have to go up a whole step so that’s not there, is it? That’s a half step so I have to go up to D sharp, okay? Now a half step above that is E, whole step, whole step, whole step, half step. In the key of B, I’m basing my playing on that scale which goes like this. It uses all the black keys, doesn’t it? Just two white keys. White, black, black, white, black, black, black, white. That’s the key of B. If I play in the key of B, I’m basing my playing on the scale of B.

Here’s the scale of B flat. Whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, whole step, half step. Now notice I played B flat and E flat. In the key of B flat, there’s two flats, B flat and E flat. If you picked up a piece of sheet music in the key of B flat, you would see two flats in the key signature, B flat and E flat.

If I play in the key of E flat, there’s three flats: B flat, E flat, and A flat. If I played a song in the key of E flat, in the key signature it would have three flats: B flat, E flat, and A flat.

The flats always occur in the same order. In other words, if you have one flat in the song, it’s always B flat. If you have two flats, they’re always B flat and E flat. If you have three flats, it’s B flat, E flat, and A flat. If you have four flats, it’s B flat, E flat, A flat and D flat. Five flats is B flat, E flat, A flat, D flat and G flat. Six flats … Well, we won’t take it that far. We’ll just go to five flats because then we get into double-flats. That’s why we’re not going to take you that far, okay?

It’s the same in sharps. If you have one sharp in the key signature, it’s always F sharp. If you have two sharps, it’s F sharp and C sharp. If you have three sharps, it’s F sharp, C sharp, and G sharp. The order of the sharps is F, C, G, D, A, E, and B.

The order of the flats is B, E, A, D, G, C, F, and the order of the sharps is just backwards from that. Say the order of the flats backwards, and you’ll be saying the order of the sharps forward. Okay? Just a little introduction to piano keys. When you play in any key, look in the key signature to see if there’s flats or sharps.

If there’s no sharps or no flats, it’s either in the key of C or it’s in the key of A-minor, which brings us to the subject of relative minor keys. Every major key has a kissin’ cousin, a relative minor key that uses the same scale. The way you find it is, you go down a step and a half from the major key.

A step and a half. That’s a half step, and that’s a whole step, so a step and a half from C is A. Now A minor is related to the key of C because it uses the same scale. It just starts and ends on a different place. Instead of starting on C and ending on C, it starts on A and ends on A, okay? It has a different feeling. If you played chords on that, you’d have a different feeling. So every major scale has a kissin’ cousin.

Let’s do one just to make it clear. If I’m in the key of B flat say, I’m basing my playing on the key of B flat which has two flats. If I want to find the relative minor, I go down a step and a half from B flat, and that takes me to G. Now I play the B flat scale, but I play it from G to G. I come out with a different feeling.

When you learn minor scales in theory or music class, you’ll learn that there’s three kinds of minor scales. There’s a natural minor, which I just played. There’s a harmonic minor, and there’s a melodic minor. I’m going to leave it at that. Just take it by faith that if you want to get into that you’re going to encounter those scales. For the purpose of what we’re talking about today, I’m going to leave it right there.

Remember there’s twelve major keys you can play in based on the major scale. There’s twelve minor keys you can play in based on the relative minor scale. Okay?
That’s it for today. If you enjoyed these piano tips, come on over to playpiano.com and sign up for our free tips because they’re free and they’re almost daily. You’ll learn on touch. You’ll learn a lot. You’ll learn a lot over time. Thanks for being with me, and we’ll see you tomorrow. Bye bye for now.

Here is the YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KA47bYYfSaE&feature=youtu.be
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Make Sure You Know All The Major Chords On The Piano!

Wednesday, August 27th, 2014
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Major Chords On The Piano – The Key To Finding Other Chords

Good morning. This is Duane Shinn. Today I’d like to talk about how easy it is to find all the other chords once you know the major chords, so make sure you know ALL the major chords on the piano. The major chords you ought to think about as like home base, because once you know the major chords, all the major chords I think we’ve talked about. There’s only 12 of them and I just played them in those few seconds right there. Once you learn those, then minor is really easy to find. Diminish is easy to find. Augmented is easy to find. Sixth easy to find. Seventh easy to find. Major 7th, easy to find. Let’s take a look at why.

Let’s say you memorized the 12 major chords. There’s the C chord. Wherever you play it on the keyboard, it’s still the C chord. All those notes are C notes right here, because the C chord is made up of C, E, and G. The F chord is like that, F, A, C. G chord, G, B, D. The D chord has a black key in the middle, that’s a D major. E major has a black key in the middle. A major has a black key in the middle. D flat is like an Oreo cookie, black on the outside, white on the inside. D flat. E flat is too, it’s an Oreo. A flat is too, it’s an Oreo. G flat is all black. B is white, black, black, and B flat is just the opposite, black, white, white. White, black, black. Black, white, white. White, black, black. Black. Tunes have been built around that, by the way, about those 2 chords.

Anyway, let’s say you know those 12 major chords. Now I want to show you why it’s so easy to find the rest. If you know that’s a major chord, to make any minor chord, all you do is lower the 3rd. The 3rd is 1, 2, 3, the 3rd scale note. So you lower the 3rd a half step and you’ve got C minor. You can play minor chords. That’s F minor. Right? So you make any major chord, like F, you can make it minor by lowering the 3rd. G major, G minor. D major, D minor. You saw I just lowered the F sharp to F natural. E major, E minor. A major, A minor. D flat major, D flat minor. I’m lowering the 3rd a half step, even though it’s from white key to white key. E flat major, E flat minor. A flat major, a flat minor. G flat major, g flat minor. B major, B minor. B flat major, B flat minor You can easily find all the minor chords simply by lowering the 3rd a half step.

Now to make an augmented chord, what you do is you raise the 5th a half step. So that would be C major, and that’s C augmented, isn’t it? You’re playing the same root and third, but you’re changing the 5th to a half step higher. That’s C augmented. F major, F augmented. G major, G augmented. D major, D augmented. E major, go up a half step for the 5th, that’s E augmented. A major, A augmented. D flat major, D flat augmented. E flat major, E flat augmented. A flat major, A flat augmented. G flat major, G flat augmented. B major, B flat augmented. B flat major, B flat augmented.

So there you have, there’s 12 major chords and then 12 minor chords, that’s 24, and then you have 12 augmented chords, so that’s 36 so far. You know 36 chords already.

Then to make a diminished triad, you lower the 3rd and the 5th a half step. This is C major. You lower the 3rd and the 5th and that’s C diminished. F diminished, lower the 3rd and the 5th. G diminished, lower the 3rd and the 5th, ans so on. I won’t go through all the chords, but you get the idea.

So we’ve learned major, minor, augmented, and diminished. Now to make it a 6th chord, you simply take the 6th note of the scale and add it to the major chord. So that’s C 6th. The 6th is the 6th note of the scale, which happens to be a whole step above G. Not a half step, a whole step, because it’s the 6th note of the c scale. That’s F major, F 6th. G major, G 6th. D major, D 6th. E major, E 6th. A major, A 6th. D flat major, D flat 6th. E flat major, E flat 6th. A flat major, A flat 6th. G flat major, G flat 6th. B major, B 6th. B flat major, B 6th.

So if you can find the 6th, you can easily find the 7th. You go up a half step from the 6th. It’s not the 7th note of the scale, it’s a flat 7th note of the scale. Technically it’s known as a dominant 7th, but in pop music you just see it notated as C7. That’s C7th. What’s F 7th? What’s G 7th? What’s D 7th? What’s E 7th? A 7th? D flat 7th? E flat 7th? A flat 7th? G flat 7th? Sorry. B 7th. And B flat 7th. So a 6th is a whole step above the 5th. A 7th is a step and a half above the 5th.

Then finally, you can learn a major 7th real easily, because it’s the 7th note of the scale. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. But also notice it’s just a half step below the root an octave higher. So you just come down a half step from the root and you have it. That’s C major 7th. F major 7th. G major 7th. D major 7th. E major 7th. I have small hands that can barely reach that. A major 7th. D flat major 7th. E flat major 7th. A flat major 7th. G flat major 7th. B major 7th. B flat major 7th.

It’s very easy to learn those chords. You’ve got 12 major, 12 minor, 12 augmented, 12 diminished, 12 sixth, 12 seventh, and 12 major 7th. Let’s count the types. Major 1, minor is 2, augment is 3, diminish is 4, 6th is 5, 7, 8. Eight times 12 is, well whatever it is, you can find it easily, just by that simple expedient of doing what I just did. That allows you to use a lot of those sophisticated chords that you might not know otherwise. There’s a major 7th. All the complex chords after that are simply a matter of altering 1 or more notes of what we just went through.

Thanks for being with me. My point is to make sure you learn the major chords, because once you know the major chords the other chords are very easy to find. The more chords you know, the better, because you can make variety in your playing that way. Okay. Thanks for being with me, and if you haven’t already, sign up for our free piano tips. Be sure and do that. Go on over to PlayPiano.com and sign up. By the way, there’s some videos there at PlayPiano.com after you sign up. Just toggle down a bit and you’ll see a bunch of instructional videos. Okay, thank you, and we’ll see you tomorrow. Bye bye.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9qFh0gq22A&feature=youtu.be
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Are Piano Players Brains Different Than Other People?

Monday, August 25th, 2014
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Yes! Piano Players Brains Are Different!

Yes, as a matter of fact, piano players brains ARE different! And other musicians too. If you’re a musician, you’ve probably suspected this. Your friends may view your skills with a bit of awe, and they might also comment that you think differently than they do. Scientific studies have proven that piano players brains are indeed different.

Musicians brain

A look into the brain

Scientists in the U.S., Norway and Sweden working together conducted a study on musicians’ brains using an electroencephalogram, or EEG, to record electrical activity. Electrodes, flat metal discs, were applied to the scalp to receive electrical impulses. The cells of the brain communicate by way of these impulses, even when a person is asleep.

After analyzing the data from the impulses, the researchers discovered that musicians have frontal lobes that are considered well-coordinated. This part of the brain handles planning and logic. In musicians’ brains there is a clear dominance of alpha waves, which are indicators that activity is happening on a certain frequency. What this means is, musicians can more effectively combine various details to get the bigger picture.

The study also showed that musicians manage their brain resources wisely. When the situation requires it, they can be on the alert and ready for whatever type of action is called for. Or if circumstances are quiet and non-threatening, they are relaxed and able to just let things develop.

Using questionnaires, the scientists determined that musicians had an inherently higher standard of moral reasoning. Musicians also reported more times of intense happiness, a sense of being unimpeded by limitations.

Specific characteristics

According to Psychology Today, brain imaging has revealed a number of differences in the brains of musicians as compared to non-musicians. For example:

• The number and size of nerve cells in the brain of a person who has undergone extensive musical training is much higher, especially in those parts of the cerebral cortex that handles auditory, spatial and motor skills.

• They have a better musical and verbal memory.

• Musical learning over the long term reorganizes the brain, so that areas that in most people are designated for one type of activity are recruited for a variety of skills in a musician’s brain.

Guitarists are always different too

According to an article in Guitar World, the neural networks found in the brains of guitar players synchronize easily and efficiently both while playing a song as well as just a bit before the actual playing. According to the study conducted by researchers in Berlin in 2012, guitarists shift at will from conscious to unconscious thought. This makes possible the impossible riffs of a genius like Jimmy Hendrix. They are able to turn off the section of their brains that handles big picture goals, achieving a flow state.

Guitarists are actually different from other musicians, not just non musicians. They are among the most intuitive people in the population, which makes it possible for them to learn a new piece of music best by watching and listening to someone else playing it. Most other musicians learn by reading and playing notes written out on paper.

As an extreme example of this inherent ability, scientists point to jazz guitarist Pat Martino. He had over 70% of his left temporal lobe surgically removed due to a hemorrhage while in his 30s. Immediately after surgery, he was unable to figure out how to play the guitar. But a mere two years later, he had relearned the very difficult skill of playing a jazz guitar.

In synch

The Berlin psychologists also studies musicians playing duets. Obviously they were able to synchronize their playing. But beyond that, they were also synchronizing their brainwaves. Though done with guitarists, researchers felt that this is probably true of all musicians. Called phase locking, it is a function of the frontal lobe.

A non musician listens to music with the right hemisphere of the brain, which handles emotions and takes note of melodic contour. A musician, on the other hand, uses his left hemisphere, which is the source of analytical activity. This makes sense because they must concern themselves with the language, or syntax, of music as they play.

Musicians can also conjure strong auditory and tonal imagery, as if they hear music with just their mind, without actual music being played.

There you have it. Musicians’s brains are different, science has proved it. The brain of the musically skilled has more brain cells, better skill sets and better memory. Musicians have well coordinated brains, in synch with other members of their tribe. And guitarists have their own tribe.

Read this fascinating article about how science shows how piano players brains are actually different from everyone else.

Click here: http://mic.com/articles/91329/science-shows-how-piano-players-brains-are-actually-different-from-everybody-elses

Other Resources:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110505083421.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily+%
28ScienceDaily%3A+Latest+Science+News%29&utm_content=Google+Feedfetcher

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/eyes-the-brain/201006/do-musicians-have-different-brains

http://www.guitarworld.com/new-study-shows-how-guitar-players-brains-are-different-everybody-elses

http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2012-11/29/musicians-synch-brain-waves

http://rogerevansonline.com/2010/03/16/musicians-brains-are-different-from-other-peoples/
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The story of Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata

Thursday, August 21st, 2014
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One of the most famous, haunting and beautiful compositions of all time: Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata

Beethoven

The summer of 1801 saw Beethoven compose what turned out to be one of his best compositions of all time: Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata. This beautiful piece was composed on an estate that belonged to Brunswick, a popular family in Hungary. Moonlight Sonata was first published in 1802 and was written to Countess Giulietta Gucciard, a 17-year-old pupil and dream girl to Beethoven.

All of Beethoven’s creation has embraced Moonlight Sonata as one of its most popular piano sonatas. ‘Moonlight Sonata’ got its name from a poet called Ludwig Rellstab who got inspired by moonlight on river Lucerna’s bank in 1832. Although different people had a different take of this composition, some biographers claimed that this was a revelation of the love Beethoven held for Guicciardi. It was also clear that The first part had a musical theme from a German ballad as much as this was a dedication to a lover.

Fischer claimed that there was no connection of this image to Beethoven’s intentions. According to Fischer, Beethoven was driven by a feeling that overwhelmed him when he noticed a friend who had died prematurely.

There are several notes from Mozart’s Don Juan in one of Beethoven’s manuscripts that follow killing. If analyzed well, you will notice that this is not a case of romantic moon lit night. It sounds more of a funeral hymn.

Here is my Granddaughter Elisabeth playing the first section:

There are three parts in piano sonata: Adagio Sostenuto, Allegretto and Presto Agitato. From these three parts, a listener gets an impression of a whole elaboration of what the themes and motifs are. The second part gives an insight of the musical theme of the first part.

Part I – Adagio Sostenuto.

This part and the accented notes makes the listener have an impression of death. The first part of the Sonata shows how Beethoven tried to add a direction that calls for whoever perfoming to have the part played without dampers.

The second part – Allegretto.

This small part is the origin of the idea that this was a birtrh of a good link between the first and last part.The feeling is regarded as denser in consistency.Also, the first part having a medicative character is seen fading away to create space where part three comes in.

The third part – Presto Agitato.

This part is clearly two times longer than the other two parts. According to Ficher, this part represents a storm. In fact, this is an impetuous storm with regards to what Beethoven had in his heart and the strong feelings over Guicciardi during the time Sonata was composed.A good listener can distinguish two themes in this particular part, a more contemptuous one and one which is more lyrical contrary to part one.

It was specified by Beethoven that this magnificent should only be played “Quasi una fantasia” which meant almost a fantasy. It is evident that Moonlight Sonata has not only inspired many a passion and parody but also fantasy. There being 13 versions available today, it is much easier for enyone with questions to find the desired answers.You will also be in a position to give your judgement on Beethoven’s intentions.

Here is Elisabeth playing it on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hggiN6A9Y14&feature=youtu.be

Here is an article on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludwig_van_Beethoven
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