Archive for March, 2010


Flats and sharps in a key signature

Tuesday, March 16th, 2010
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

The key signature at the start of a line of printed music announces both what sharps or flats are being used in the song, as well as what key the song is in. If there is just one flat in the key signature, the flat is always Bb. Two flats in the key signature are always Bb and Eb. 3 flats in the key signature would be Bb, Eb, and Ab. 4 flats would be Bb, Eb, Ab, and Db. Then comes Gb, Cb, and Fb. You can easily remember the order of the flats by spelling the word “BEAD” and then recall the phrase “Go Catch Fish.”
The sharps in a key signature are just reverse from the flats; instead of BEADGCF, the order of the sharps is FCGDAEB. So one sharp in the key signature is F#, 2 sharps in the key signature would be F# and C#, and so on.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

What is the Circle of 5ths?

Friday, March 12th, 2010
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

The circle of 5th (or circle of keys) shows the relationship between the various keys one can play in, and each subsequent key is a 5th away from the previous key (or a 4th away — depends on which way you move in the circle). For example, the key of C has no sharps or flats. To the right of the key of C on the circle is the key of F with one flat, while to the left of the key of C on the circle is the key of G. Each subsequent key has one more flat in the key signature (as you move to the right) or one more sharp (as you move to the left.) Watch the short video:

< For more information on the circle, please go to http://www.playpiano.com/101-tips/20-circle-of-keys.htm

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Complex 2-hand voicing for piano

Thursday, March 11th, 2010
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 6.0/10 (1 vote cast)

Complex 2-hand voicing for piano is done in various ways, but this video shows one way to do it using a simple chord progression. Watch the voicing develop as we move from simple triads to 7ths to octave-5ths in the right hand to 13ths and 9ths along with the 7th in the left hand, while the damper pedal sustains a low root on the first chord of the progression:

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 6.0/10 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Relative minor scales & relative minor keys

Wednesday, March 10th, 2010
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

Every major scale has a “kissing cousin” which is related to it known as a “relative minor scale”. It is related because it uses the same notes as the relative major scale in its natural form.
There are three types of minor scales: natural minor, harmonic minor, and melodic minor. Watch this 8-minute video:

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

The Key of Bb major

Tuesday, March 9th, 2010
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)

The key of Bb major has two flats in the key signature — Bb and Eb. The primary chords are Bb, Eb, and F, and the main secondary chords are Cm, Dm and Gm. Watch this short video:

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Review our article:
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)